11/23/2021»»Tuesday

Install Portainer

Install Portainer. If you actually want to follow along in this tutorial, you'll want to install Portainer / Porainter-CE (Community Edition). I really like this product, as it gives a pretty UI to the docker tools which are Cli (Command Line Interface) only - at least in Linux).

Instructions - Install Docker and Portainer on a Raspberry Pi. Ensure that your Raspberry Pi is up to date by running the commands below. Sudo apt update. Sudo apt upgrade. The next thing we are going to run is the script to install Docker on our Raspberry Pi. Just a stupid question from a newbie to Docker and Portainer. I have to take over an already existing, installed but not configured working installation from Portainer on Windows Server 2019. How can I change the working, data and or, most important, the image directory without installing all new? I can't find a solution on Google since days. As I mentioned, Portainer is a container; so the installation isn't so much an install as it is a pull. So open up your terminal window (or log into your Docker headless server). Installation To install Portainer, you can go on the official Portainer site, and click on 'Install' at the top right: Portainer is a tool for Docker.but you can also install it using Docker! Does it sound strange? To install it we need to type just 2 commands: Let's type them together. On a prompt type.

This repo contains helm and YAML for deploying Portainer into a Kubernetes environment. Follow the applicable instructions for your edition / deployment methodology below:

  • Deploying with Helm
    • Community Edition
    • Enterprise Edition
  • Deploying with manifests
    • Community Edition
    • Enterprise Edition

Install the repository:

Ubuntu

Create the portainer namespace:

Community Edition

Install the helm chart:

Using NodePort on a local/remote cluster

Using a cloud provider’s loadbalancer

Using ClusterIP with an ingress

For advanced helm customization, see the chart README

Enterprise Edition

Using NodePort on a local/remote cluster

Using a cloud provider’s loadbalancer

Using ClusterIP with an ingress

Install

For advanced helm customization, see the chart README

If you’re not into helm, you can install Portainer using manifests, by first creating the portainer namespace:

And then…

Install PortainerPortainer

Community Edition

Install Portainer Docker

Using NodePort on a local/remote cluster

Using a cloud provider’s loadbalancer

Enterprise Edition

Using NodePort on a local/remote cluster

Using a cloud provider’s loadbalancer

The charts/manifests will create a persistent volume for storing Portainer data, using the default StorageClass.

In some Kubernetes clusters (microk8s), the default Storage Class simply creates hostPath volumes, which are not explicitly tied to a particular node. In a multi-node cluster, this can create an issue when the pod is terminated and rescheduled on a different node, “leaving” all the persistent data behind and starting the pod with an “empty” volume.

While this behaviour is inherently a limitation of using hostPath volumes, a suitable workaround is to use add a nodeSelector to the deployment, which effectively “pins” the portainer pod to a particular node.

The nodeSelector can be added in the following ways:

  1. Edit your own values.yaml and set the value of nodeSelector like this:
Install portainer debian 10
  1. Explicictly set the target node when deploying/updating the helm chart on the CLI, by including --set nodeSelector.kubernetes.io/hostname=<YOUR NODE NAME>

  2. If you’ve deployed Portainer via manifests, without Helm, run the following one-liner to “patch” the deployment, forcing the pod to always be scheduled on the node it’s currently running on:

Install Portainer Raspberry Pi

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